Dec. 19, 2021

410: THROWBACK: How to Succeed in Politics [and Other Forms of Devil Worship] with Remso Martinez (October, 2019

410: THROWBACK: How to Succeed in Politics [and Other Forms of Devil Worship] with Remso Martinez (October, 2019

This dark comedy will force you to ask whether success at all costs is worth losing your humanity in the process.


This THROWBACK episode features our good friend, Remso Martinez, discussing his phenomenal book, "How to Succeed in Politics [and Other Forms of Devil Worship]".

 

This book will make a great gift to any politico in your life!

 

ORIGINAL SHOW NOTES:

 

Two men separated by time embark on parallel paths to succeed in the blood sport that is professional politics. In the aftermath of the 2016 election, a young political operative named Art Brown finds himself about to sit at the right hand of power in Washington D.C only to end up falling out of the insider-circles he spent years trying to find acceptance in.

 

The other man would start his political path as one of the most progressive statesmen in the south, only to evolve into the villain of the civil rights movement- George C. Wallace.

 

Filled with political intrigue and suspense that spans among generations, along with that classic gonzo humor Remso W. Martinez has become known for, “How to Succeed in Politics (and Other Forms of Devil Worship)” is a dark comedy that will force you to ask whether success at all costs is worth losing your humanity in the process.

 

Today's episode features all that and more, as we are once again joined by Remso to discuss his newest book, "How to Succeed in Politics (and Other Forms of Devil Worship)"!

 

Purchase an autographed "How to Succeed in Politics (and Other Forms of Devil Worship" using this exclusive link to Brian Nichols Show listeners (Makes a great stocking stuffer/gift!): https://rwmartinez.com/brian-nichols-listener-special/

 

Remso's Past Appearances on The Brian Nichols Show-

20: Stay Away From The Libertarians! with Remso Martinez: https://briannichols.fireside.fm/25

37: Censorship Online Can Happen to You with Remso Martinez: https://briannichols.fireside.fm/social-media-censorship-of-libertarians-and-conservatives

BONUS- The Weekly Standard is Dead So Who is Next on The Remso Martinez Experience: https://briannichols.fireside.fm/the-weekly-standard-is-dead-so-who-is-next-on-the-remso-martinez-experience

 

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Take our audience survey for a chance to win a "Don't Hurt People, Don't Take Their Stuff" bumper sticker! 

 

 

Transcript

Brian Nichols  
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Victor Antonio  
selling is all about really it's we're not selling a product you're not selling a service you're not selling. You're not selling whatever you think you're selling a solution you're selling change

Brian Nichols  
Welcome to The Brian Nichols Show your source for common sense politics on the we are libertarians network as a sales and marketing executive in the greater telecommunications cybersecurity industry, Brian works with C level executives to help them future proof their company's infrastructure for an uncertain future. And in each episode, Brian takes that experience and applies it's the liberty movement. And this is why we talk about being the trusted advisor you should be able to help us that expert guidance and all the opinions that I'm sure that you have, and help lead them towards not just a decision but the right decision. Instead of focusing on simply winning arguments or being right. We're teaching the basic fundamentals of sales and their application in the world of politics showing you how to ask better questions, tell better stories and ultimately change people's minds. And now your host, Brian Nichols. So, Martinez, we're trying to The Brian Nichols Show, Ryan. Oh, it's great to be here. Thanks for having me back on. Of course, you're you're always one of my favorite guests to have on the show cuz you're always doing wild and crazy exciting things in your life. And in us. It makes me a little jealous can like am I can't be as cool as Remzi oh, gosh, it always happens afterwards. You can always just say that. Okay, you know what, we'll go with that then. But you've been busy. Renzo, you've been getting some some work done in terms of getting some new books out and you've been getting a new job. So let's just kind of recap where you've been since the last year in The Brian Nichols Show.

Remso Martinez  
Oh, man. Well, last time, I think I was actually on the program. I was working for Young Americans for Liberty's super PAC went the door pack. after that. I started a copywriting business that didn't pan out as well as I thought it would. So then I got huckster into working for an advertising firm, which turned out to just be a big giant scam to make me sell Chinese makeup door to door. That's fun. So at the lowest point of that I was writing a book, which would be my you know, official divorce of politics has succeeded politics and other forms of devil worship. And around the time that I had finished that I quit that job selling Chinese makeup door to door and I was like, I gotta just figure out what's going on my life. And then starting in early July, I got a job offer to work as a social media coordinator and advocacy outreach coordinator, as well as an opinion columnist and Pinyon, journalist over at The Washington Times in DC. So lots happened in a very brief amount of time, still kind of jumping around. But for the near future, I plan on just, you know, hunkering down and just enjoying what I'm doing day to day at the times.

Brian Nichols  
I mean, rems I'm gonna be honest, I think I could really see you flourishing in a role as a door to door trainees, makeup salesperson,

Remso Martinez  
you know, I thought it would be better than it was genuine. I thought, you know, maybe if this is where the logical conclusion of my story ends. Maybe I should just be really good at it, but it was a lot harder than you think.

Brian Nichols  
Bye, guys. I can only imagine. But yeah, I will, I guess I think you're very well suited where you are currently a Washington Times. And I mean, it's been pretty cool. I've been watching as you know, heck, even the president United States has tweeted out some articles from the Washington Times. So I mean, just showing the actual outreach you guys have over there. That's, that's pretty incredible. It's been

Remso Martinez  
a it's been an insane amount of fun. And though the one thing I always want to specify, I always try and specify my terms. In terms of the of the writing I still do. I'm not I you know, I use the term commentator, pundit, because people often use that. But I really like to prefer, you know, refer to myself as an opinion journalist. Because I don't often try and talk about things I don't have explicit first hand knowledge with and unlike commentators, I'll actually take the time to go investigate something to actually go research and report a story. And then come at it from, you know, from an individual biased perspective. So at least you know, where I'm coming from with things and the Washington Times has been a great platform for that I've written several pieces as of now in the free time I have about everyone from Bill Weld to Lincoln Chafee, and you know, even my time as a Mall Cop. And I've got several pieces currently in the docket right now, for a few editions of this month's paper, we're five days a week paper. So you know, we've always got stuff coming out. But it's, it's been a great opportunity. I love the folks there, I love the things that we've been able to achieve. And working specifically in a commentary section of the paper to make sure that we can get all of our content has been key. And I don't know if you've seen this, but you know, one of my personal goals was to get more of a very intellectual discourse going on, because we are a conservative commentary. But several weeks ago, we launched a weekly print column with young voices. Cliff Maloney from Young Americans for Liberty has been published with us multiple occasions, just this past month alone, we're getting way more, you know, classical liberals, you know, traditional conservatives into the commentary section, which is so great, because often libertarians, I think we kind of just jump into our own corners, and we only talk to ourselves. But this is a great opportunity to discuss all these great ideas that you discuss on your show, to a wide portion of the population that might not be familiar with it. So it's just been a great honor to be at the helm of that and really help kind of push that.

Brian Nichols  
So tell me what it's like, you're in the newsroom. And all sudden you see, you know, a tweet go out from President Trump. And it's a Washington Times article, what's the reaction like in the the office?

Remso Martinez  
You know, it's it's always great, you know, we compete for those tweets, we're competing for those Drudge Report hits. And, you know, it's just, I might sound like, I'm kind of like, you know, kind of low balling it. But I work in the office five days, a week, Sunday through Thursday, when we're getting a lot of our stuff ready. And you know, the the new cycle moves so fast, especially when you're in the bloodstream of it. There have been days where I'll, you know, I have to watch MSNBC, because you know, if I don't know, and well, and you know, like, this week, for example, Chuck Todd's open to show with like, I want to wish you a good day. But this morning, we all woke up to an American nightmare. And it's like, Dude, you said that literally yesterday about something else. So I used to be used to really stress me out. At the beginning of this, I worked in a newsroom a while back at the Media Research Center. And he stressed me out then too. And over the years I was freelancing. So I wasn't in a newsroom being in newsroom again. I've got CNN and Fox and MSNBC and all these other places. And I'm a social media guy. So I see the best and worst of humanity every couple of seconds. But you know, it's it's amazing to see what people are willing to get mad at and the stories that people prioritize. Because, you know, when you actually look at news that's going on and the things that actually affects not just your life, but the life of millions, we tend to really lowball the important stuff, and we focus on the stupid stuff. And it's, uh, you know, I think I hate it. When I see politicians on TV. They're like, I trust the American people and make the right choice. I'm like, now the American people chose to talk about something that has nothing to do with anybody, instead of talking about the actual stuff, and it can get kind of frustrating but you know, the the biggest lessons I've learned is be patient. Just kind of ignore the sensationalism, literally do anything else, just focus on the work directly in front of you. And understand that, you know, within 10 minutes, people are probably already going to forget what they're angry about so they can find something else they're angry about.

Brian Nichols  
And whatever you just don't read the comment section.

Remso Martinez  
Don't read it. It's not worth Oh, no. Like it's it's never it's never healthy, though, that though there are some people that will message The Washington Times Facebook page. You know, I won't I won't name people but we had one woman who was probably in her 50s 60s She told us that she didn't like us. So she wanted me to remove ourselves from the internet.

Brian Nichols  
Oh, god bless boomers.

Remso Martinez  
God bless boomers. I mean, you know, without them, I wouldn't have a smile on my face. But it's, you know, it's a lot of work. It was you know, kinda like drinking before. Fire Hose the first couple of months, but now I'm in a good rhythm. You know, we're getting a lot of stuff done. And you know, if I can make another safe home for libertarians to, you know, have discussions with folks as well as, you know, just promote good to on this commentary. And I mean, I'm just talking about the commentary section, we have a whole news team as well, which is out, you know, actually investigating stories reporting stories every day. And these are people that go from, you know, liberal to politically apathetic to conservative, I mean, our reporters are truly varied, and their beliefs, but ultimately, you know, they understand their job is to go find a story and actually follow it through to its natural end and sort of trying to premeditate the ending. So, I mean, this is just, this is a great place to be. And, you know, folks, if you're not following the Washington Times right now, I really think you should not just because I work there, but because I've been reading them. And I think the only other news news outlet I really respected was the Wall Street Journal. So I mean, shout out to the Wall Street Journal as well. But really, if you want, if you want to get balanced site that has good, you know, actual news, as well as just honest to goodness, commentary from all your favorite people. I mean, I can't think of a better place

Brian Nichols  
and to see that there are a number of libertarians who had been able to use the platform of the Washington Times to get the libertarian messaging out there. I mean, that's, that's super exciting just on itself. Because, I mean, the Washington Times it's, you know, conservative outlet. But, you know, it's it's so exciting, and so invigorating to actually see the Libertarians now have a platform like the Washington Times, and we're reaching, you know, hundreds of 1000s more people that otherwise wouldn't have the message.

Remso Martinez  
Absolutely. And when I look at the numbers, and we look at the conversation that people are having with our explicit libertarian writers, Casey Givens from young voices, he's the editor there, he published a column with a several weeks ago about, you know, the FDA stupid war on vaping. And then a week after that, we had another article in our young voices column discussing why Trump is bad for guns. And you know, that the conversation is beautiful, because if people are arguing, and if people are discussing, you know, people might freak out when they see that, but all the attention is ultimately good attention if it's done for the right reason of trying to get people to have a conversation. I think George Orwell said it best when you're just repeating what other people want you to say you're doing publicity, but the purpose of the newspapers to publish the things that get people riled up. Good, bad or indifferent. I mean, I think that's the ultimate goal of things. And when they look at, you know, media coordinators, other outlets, you know, you can think of a place that's not explicitly libertarian, I don't count reason and the others in this conversation, just because, I mean, they, while they are respected amongst, you know, the politically savvy community, you know, a good chunk of your American population isn't going to read National Review, they're not going to read

Brian Nichols  
their new national review or reason magazine are to be honest. Yeah,

Remso Martinez  
I mean, no, no one no, you know, 99% of the country does not care what David trench has to say. Not no offense to David friend or know who David French is. Exactly. But you know, most your most your people are either your CNN Democrats or your Fox News, Republicans. So if you can get them to have the conversations that those big cable outlets aren't going to have, necessarily, that I think we're doing a good thing.

Brian Nichols  
It's exciting to see, some libertarian commentators are now getting platforms. And yeah, this is outside of the Washington Times. But you know, even like Fox News, Brad Palumbo, who's a friend of the show, and he was kind of doing more work. On the side back, I think I forget what it was young voices, I think. And then he ended up.

Remso Martinez  
He was a young voices, alumnus right now. He's one of the online editors at the Washington Examiner. That's right.

Brian Nichols  
And his platform has given him a chance to appear on the morning show for Fox News. And he's been on Kennedy a few times. So it's exciting, again, to see libertarians out there, and you again, reaching those people that we otherwise wouldn't reach?

Remso Martinez  
Yeah, I mean, you gotta hustle. Because the one thing that, you know, ultimately, we need to understand this, that we're not going to get a libertarian elected president. And we're not going to affect overwhelming national policy. And we're not going to go ahead and get people to have these conversations unless we actually interject ourselves. And that means getting involved in the process of things. And you know, I know everyone wants to be Kyle, like, you know, the term back in the good old days of, you know, the Libertarian conversation online used to be so libertarian, you know, everyone wants to be famous for nothing and bitching about everything, but ultimately, you know, you've got a hustle. And, you know, it took me a long time to get here. And I'm not necessarily saying that everyone needs to get involved in media. But you know, there are always opportunities to take your talents and to go ahead and put them in fields where ultimately, you know, you can affect the best outcome because our ideas are peaceful. Our ideas even help out in the business sector because we're fiscally responsible. And, you know, socially, I think we can't get along with everybody because we just want everyone to be the best version of themselves. So you know, however anyone thinks they can do I think They should go and do that. I mean, I'll give you an anecdote, right. I

Brian Nichols  
had Justin Amash on my show back in the summertime. And it was his first actual appearance on a media channel to discuss, you know, his really leaving the Republican Party. And it was an awesome opportunity to ask him a lot of questions, but then also have my interviewer reach a lot of people. I mean, for example, I was reached out to you by Vanity Fair of all places to do a talk about my about my interview, and they put me into an article about Justin Amash, possibly running for elected office for President. And I had a high school friend reach out to me who read the article on their own. Notice that I was quoted in it. And then they went to the show and listened to the interview. And they're like, you know, I never really knew what I was politically, but after listening to that show, I think I'm a libertarian, and like that right there that kind of like put it all together for me, I'm like, Okay, this is why we do it like this. That that actually is my interview with Justin Amash. And then being able to get interviewed by Vanity Fair, because of my interview Justin Amash, like it all connected, and it really shows you know, why we do this on a day to day basis, we don't get the the instant gratification. I mean, I don't tell you this, you know, the hours the the just you know, exhaustion you have and you're trying to do the time that it takes to do that either the shows or the articles or, or in we're gonna talk about your book, but then actually see it come to fruition. It's so rewarding. It's just so inspiring and keeps you going to the next day.

Remso Martinez  
Oh, absolutely. I'm I love what a Jordan Belfort The Wolf of Wall Street once said, it takes decades to become an overnight success.

Brian Nichols  
I like that, I like that a lot. It's so true. And speaking of, you know, overnight success REMSA, you're an up and coming, Best Selling Author. Now, obviously, the first time I had you in the show was discuss your first book, which is stay away from the libertarians, which is a great read. And also, I'll include the link to that episode. So folks can go back and listen to that. And they'll actually get a chance to click the link to go buy that amazing book over on Amazon. But now you're on the show today to discuss your newest book, which is how to succeed in politics and other forms of devil worship. So let's kind of start from the beginning. Ramza What was the inspiration to go from more of a, you know, I'd say, autobiographical kind of approach to things from your own perspective as being a libertarian, talking about the different, you know, discussions in libertarian world, and how would they relate to reaching out to people outside of our spheres of influence, but now you're talking about an actual, like narrative, you know, in a book, you're, you're going into national story mode. So without giving too much away, kind of set the frame for that as well.

Remso Martinez  
Yeah, absolutely. It got to the point in life where I began to realize that whenever we kind of put put ourselves in boxes, especially if other people were pulling us in boxes, you know, Seidel ones, you know, you're Republican, you're a libertarian, you're a Christian, you're not, you're gay, you're straight. When it comes to all these things, we close off off the conversations that we have. And with stay away from the libertarians. I mean, that whole approach really did kind of change my thing. King in terms of how am I going to go ahead and expand these topics, these ideas and conversations to people that aren't libertarians? You know, even down to the title stay away from the libertarians. The idea of that was somewhat subterfuge in a comedic way because it was like, Oh, if you don't like libertarians, you should read this book. And by the end of it, you're saying and the Fed. So I mean, the first book shop to the to the Amazon bestsellers list in his category did remarkably well. And well, I noticed that it was primarily in libertarian circles, even though a good number of you know, very, you know, Trad con, traditional conservatives also picked it up in a few liberals that reached out so

Brian Nichols  
I'll say what didn't even like Michael Knowles and Ben Shapiro on them over the daily wider give you an endorsement

Remso Martinez  
to absolutely. And that was one of the funniest things ever happens, because people genuinely thought that I was shitting on libertarians at that point. But they liked the book, too. I mean, they liked it, because I took a very objective look at the modern libertarian movement. And I think we're still very much in the modern libertarian movement. Because, you know, now we're post Ron Paul. Right? That's very strange. And, you know, I know that you have a different take on this. But I also think that the star of Rand Paul is also somewhat, you know, dimming. as days go by, I think we're in kava moment of time where we're kind of leaderless to a certain degree, and I know that libertarians don't like to be led, but ultimately, that's how all all cultural movements go along. And we're just trying to figure out like, where do we go in this Trump era, some people like Trump, I like Trump, some people don't like Trump, and that's perfectly fine, doesn't make you less or more libertarian. But ultimately, if that I understood that, you know, with a nonfiction book coming from a libertarian perspective, I was shutting off a large portion of the audience. So what I wanted to do was I wanted to go ahead and do what I've always wanted to do write a story from scratch, while at the same time discussing the topics I knew and you know, for most of my adult life, I've been a political consultant, political operative here in the here in the Commonwealth of Virginia along the east coast. And what I had at my disposal were a lot of, you know, antecedents, little short stories that would basically make anyone fearful that we have so much power concentrated and such few amount of people that run their daily lives. But I also knew if I write this book as a nonfiction book, much like my first one, I'm gonna cut off the conversation because you're gonna be like, Oh, Remsen Martinez is a radical libertarian, or I'm somewhere teen is usually votes, Republican RAM somewhere teen is all this other stuff. People that think they know me, putting their own objections towards reading the story, which ultimately is just meant to be a good story. But you know, the whole underlying goal of this book is to ask all readers, regardless of background, or worldview or ideology, how far are you willing to go to succeed? If you lose yourself in the process? What is success if you lose your humanity, so in order to do this, I crafted a historical fiction story about a man that many of us know, George Wallace, one of the most infamous evil segregationists of all time, and I talked about his rise to power, and how that man almost became president of the United States. It's crazy, think about so I've got the real historical portion there. But then I have a paralleling story about a political consultant in the post Trump era, who's trying to make his way in the world of politics, and the crazy BS that goes on when you try and succeed, the costs that are levied on you. So ultimately, it's a dark comedy. It has both, you know, the historical angle of things as well as a modern narrative take. And you know, my goal at the end of day, just as an author is to write a story that people are going to love to laugh at. And they're going to love it for different reasons. So dance, oh, go ahead. Sorry. Yeah. And I mean, so far from the, you know, a lot of people have reviewed it online, you can go check out the Amazon reviews. And so the editorial reviews, by the time people have finished the book, and they read it, they all have drastically different conclusions, and takeaways. And they're all like, diametrically opposed to each other. And as an author, I love it. So I mean, this has been, this has just been a really fun experience. Because when you just go at things from the aspect of here's just a really good story of some of these themes in between. And you're not telling the reader how to think they ultimately, you know, do the one thing that a lot of people don't want them to do they start thinking for themselves. And then I mean, it's it's been beautiful.

Brian Nichols  
So what's been one of the reactions that you didn't anticipate from writing the books, obviously, if you're writing the book from a libertarian perspective, if somebody knew who you were maybe, and they came in with a preconceived notion, was there anybody that you know, was like, Hey, I had this preconceived notion. And, you know, I was completely floored at what I heard that was completely against what I thought it was going to be. Or maybe something that you wrote when you wrote the book, thinking you were gonna write as a reaction, and then you're getting complete opposite reactions.

Remso Martinez  
Yeah. So the George Wallace story arc, which is novelized, but it's all true. And I have all my sources and references cited in the back of the book. That was something what was really funny was so the the main protagonist in the book is a young political consultant named Art Brown. So his story starts off, right, you know, on the 2016, election onward. And his story throughout the book, parallels of the real life of George Wallace. So growing up, I mean, all we hear about George Wallace is this evil segregationist? You know, this man who talked about segregation forever, just the epitome of you know, political power for the worst intentions possible in America. But what I wanted people to understand is, how does a man just end up that way? Because no one just wakes up being a horrendous human being right, he had to make very deliberate decisions, which led him to that point. And then here's the big question, what happens after that? What happens in a post segregation America, what happens in the post Civil Rights Era America, some men like George Wallace, so by understanding his very, you know, tragic rise and his much more tragic fall, you begin to understands that everything we see today is deliberate, and that people have to make these decisions which will impact the lives of 1000s, if not millions, and what is the cost of that? Because George Wallace, for example, I mean, not many people know this. But in 1972, he almost became the Democratic Party nominee for president against Nixon. We tend to forget about that. The Democrats almost nominated George Wallace, while St. Think about that. But what happened after that, he ends up getting shot over in Laurel, Maryland, you know, about 45 minutes away. The man is confined to a wheelchair his entire life. He He's politically irrelevant. His marriages fail, his family's falling apart, but he's still getting elected governor. Not many people know this, but from 1968 Onward when he got reelected for governor the second time He won the majority of the black vote now Alabama, by 60 to 80%. Wow. How does that happen? So all these strange occurrences that we've tend to just kind of ignore all the strange things that happen can only happen in a world where politics becomes our religion. And with Art Brown, you know, at the beginning of a book, he's at the top of his career, and then he gets in League of some bad people, and then he has to fall down and build himself up. And as he's doing that, he has to visualize things again, and he has to makes make a lot of tough decisions. Again, he's like, like, is this worth it? Right? Like, what is the cost? And that's the question we tend to forget every day, because we live in a minute by minute society instead of realizing that we've got more time in front of us than we seem to understand, or seems to comprehend. But you know, at the end of the day, What world are we leaving for ourselves and those around us? And when it comes to government, it's not just a game, it's very deliberate, and it can be very dangerous. And, you know, in terms of the, the reception I've been getting from people, I mean, listen, if you hate Trump, you're gonna read this book, and you're gonna be like, wow, look, he's talking like George Wallace, he's doing all these things just to obtain power. If you love Trump, you're gonna be like, Wow, these Democrats have always been racist, and they'll do everything in anything to obtain power. But ultimately, by the end of by the end of the book, what I want you to do is I want you to say, Wow, there are people like this out there in the world, they've always been here, they'll be here going forward, and whether they're promoting my agenda or not, maybe we should limit the power and authority, they have to make sure they won't be as dangerous. If let's say I happen to be on the receiving end of that.

Brian Nichols  
So what's one thing you've you've learned as you were doing your research for this book, I do know that you really made it a point to make sure you're sticking to as close to historical accuracy as you can. So what's maybe one thing you learned that you didn't know, as you're doing the research for this?

Remso Martinez  
I mean, Nuance is incredibly important. I mean, I'm gonna get kind of, you know, metaphysical here, but you know, with George Wallace, it was it, his life is just so fractured, it's really hard to get a good feeling on the guy I equate him in, in the novel itself to anagen Skywalker, because starts off good starts going kind of rogue becomes an evil Sith Lord, then he saves his son and kills the Emperor. But how do we think of him when we think of Darth Vader? Right? We only think of still the guy in black suits. Yeah, that's kind of like George Wallace, in a way. But then as I was researching his life, I look at the other characters, both real and fictional, have created, we've began to realize that, you know, life isn't necessarily as black and white as we want it to sound, especially when you pay attention, only media, sound bites and political puns and things like that. Because I don't think anyone is like a fluid, good guy, or fluid, bad guy, I think, you know, by our very nature, all people are flawed. And because of that, you know, we can make really good decisions, and we can make really bad decisions. But we're not going to do so on a streak we do so interchangeably to different variations of impact. And when it comes to George Wallace, here you have the guy who's like the poster child for segregation ism, in the 60s, who's doing so much for the black community in Alabama, in the 70s, onward, and very much in the in the 90s. He died 1998 towards the latter years of his life, he did a lot to try and heal a lot of, you know, post segregation, racial strife in the south. And that was a really shocking thing, because you can't learn that because then what you're trying to do is to try and become, you know, a southern segregationist apologists. But the thing is, that's just what happened. And that's not what I'm saying. That's what other people said, and that's how things actually were. So it really, it really made me you know, somewhat uncomfortable at times, because there will be some moments where it's like, wow, I, I kind of like that fact about them. I kind of liked that personality trait about them. And then he'll just do something horrendous. And you're like, you evil son of a bitch, what the hell. And you know, it was it was really funny at one point, because as the book leads up, and this isn't a spoiler, but as the book leads up to the assassination, I had the potential to the attempted assassination attempt to George Wallace in 1972. And many people say they were really looking forward to it. And then when they read it, and they read what happened afterwards, they feel terrible. And I think that's great. Because if you can make your readers emotions change on a dime like that, you've done a really good job. And I didn't have to, you know, let them know about them. I didn't talk to people who let me knew they were reading the book while they're reading it. I had them come to me of the stuff because I wanted the raw real answer. And the thing is, if we can see how flawed people can make bad decisions and what they can try and do to make up for it. You know, there, there are so many opportunities for us to understand the nuances and the complications of life. So ultimately, we could focus less on what happened yesterday and focus more on how to make things better. Now,

Brian Nichols  
I was actually listening to Scott Horton on Dave Smith part of the problem back a couple weeks ago, and they're actually discussing this very similar topic in terms of looking at George W. Bush and how really like the aftermath of the war in Iraq, it like broke him as a person, because, you know, genuinely, it comes down to I think he's a good person. And he was just very easily misled, because he was, he thought he was doing the right thing. And then he comes to find out, you know, all the damaging things became a consequence of, you know, the war in Iraq, in the, in the 1000s of lives of people he sent over there who, you know, their lives were lost. And it really did break him as a person to see not only the damage that he really ultimately caused, but also the reaction that was, you know, looked at afterwards and, you know, Bush's a warmonger? And, you know, just go down the line. And it's, you know, the reality is, we as just individuals are flawed. And that's not necessarily something that we can never fix, but something that we can better acknowledge. And, you know, I think there is definitely a path forward for people when they're looking for redemption, so long as they're able to look back at what happened, and acknowledge that you know, that something negative happened, and that they're moving forward and trying to make things you know, better because of it. I mean, in this case, it sounds like with George Wallace is a prime example of that, where you have someone who he acknowledges that he was on the wrong side of history to use that phrase that I absolutely hate, but to use that, essentially, and then say, you know, and I'm going to try to to do my best to fix me, Walter Jones, God rest his soul, you know, one of the most courageous members of Congress because he voted for the war on the wars in Iraq. And he afterwards after he realized how terrible was he made it a point to be one of the most anti war members of Congress? That's there. I mean, up until his death, I think it was early this year. Correct. If I'm wrong, Renzo. I mean, he was the most anti war member of Congress there was right up there with Justin Amash, Thomas Massie. And that's something that I like to see is that people realize that they've made the mistakes and they try to, you know, make amends going forward. And they understand they acknowledge what happened.

Remso Martinez  
Yeah. And that's why I was so upset that John McCain had had a much bigger funeral that seemed to last ages. And no one really paid attention to the fact that Walter Jones died of cancer. So unexpectedly, I mean, you know, that's just a personal petty gripe, because Walter Jones at least tried to, you know, make some salvage with his life, whereas John McCain went down, doubling down, right. I mean, you know, one of my favorite films of all time is Schindler's List. And you look at Oscar Schindler. And I mean, the man definitely changed for the better, and you have some, you know, ideological peers that are out there that were like, Oh, he should have left Germany and gone to America and spoken up against the Nazis. That's like, Yeah, but you know, you weren't there in that situation, look at the good that he did, do he sabotage Nazi munitions, he saved 1000s of people. And he became an honorary citizen of the people of Israel, like, you know, that that takes a lot of courage to do, especially when everyone around you is saying one thing, and you're trying to do another, I mean, it takes an immense amount of courage to do so. And in politics, you know, ultimately, what is the cost of winning if you lose your soul in the process, I mean, there are several people in Congress now representing, you know, representing their districts, and it has representatives now, who I once considered personal friends, who now it's like, I don't even know who they are, because they became corrupted by their own greed. And it becomes a very difficult search circumstance, because, you know, we tie people with party and we tie party with our entire lives, and we turn ideologies into religion. And it becomes very dangerous, because when you just pursue power for the sake of it, I mean, you're gonna get consumed by it. Nobody ever gets out of it without, you know, a severe cost and what I try and show off the book, you know, both the both the storylines of Art Brown in today's world and George Wallace of yesteryear. They're both a cautionary tale of what could happen, but they're also what I hope people will understand is they're ultimately, you know, stories of hope that it all comes down to very deliberate choices.

Brian Nichols  
All right, Ramza Martinez, where can folks go ahead and find this fantastic new book? I know, I know that you're going to be able to give us a link but I think it's good for people to hear it. If they're driving, they can go ahead and find it afterwards.

Remso Martinez  
Absolutely. You can go ahead and get my newest novel Haske. Seaton, politics and other forms of devil worship on Amazon and Barnes and Noble today and both Kindle and print is

Brian Nichols  
now as their Now I know this is the main question, is there one that's more beneficial to you as the author if they go Kindle versus a print version?

Remso Martinez  
Nope. But here's what I am going to go ahead and offer. Brian Nichols show listeners today. So pay attention people, save you some money and get you something awesome. I'm going to go ahead and send Brian a link that you can only access through his show notes. If you click on that link, I'm willing to give you a discounted, signed copy $7 off $18 for a signed copy of has succeeded politics only available for listeners of this show. So if you've made it all this way, yeah, good job. Go to Brian's show notes. I'll give him the link and you can get a signed copy for $18 today so you save seven bucks,

Brian Nichols  
say look at that people helping people it's a wonderful thing how to succeed in politics and other forms of devil worship. Renzo, thank you for being so generous, I won't be sure to include that note, or that link rather to the show notes so people can go ahead and click that right there. So if you are driving or the name will pull over, make sure you take your time there and we're being saved and go into it while driving be dangerous. I mean, what's it What says Stanley Hudson say in the office he says drive fast and leave a sexy corpse I mean, there you go. That's Florida Stanley though remember we got to make sure it's for us because other Stanley wouldn't say that but uh, anyways rams out hey, we're wrapping up here where can folks go ahead and find you over in social media so they can stay up to date with all the the works going on there with your your your novels, but also all the work over at Washington Times.

Remso Martinez  
Facebook, Instagram and Twitter all at Hey, Rem so h EY REM S Oh, hey, RAM, so

Brian Nichols  
easy enough to remember all this RAM. So always a great time having the show. Thank you so much for taking time out of your very busy schedule for for joining us today.

Remso Martinez  
Thank you, Brian. Take care as always.

Brian Nichols  
Thanks for listening to The Brian Nichols Show.

Remso Martinez  
Find more episodes at the Brian Nichols show.com

Brian Nichols  
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