April 4, 2022

473: Mastering the Upsell (with Victor Antonio)

The fastest way to revenue growth is not finding new business - it's upselling to your existing customer base!


On today's episode of The Brian Nichols Show with sales legend and author. Victor Antonio:

 

"The job of the salesperson is to sell value. So, if somebody questions what they're selling us, you mean, "I should go back and sell them more?"

 

No, we don't go back and sell more, we go back and help more, we add more value to what we've already sold.

 

If you're selling something that's worthwhile, why not keep selling them more of it? If it's helping their business grow, value for value, there's people who are willing to pay what you have to offer." 

 

 

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Transcript

Brian Nichols  
faced with an uncertain future many business owners and technology professionals don't have time needed to invest in their business technology strategies and as a result are afraid of their technology getting outdated and putting their company and customers information at risk. The digital future is already here. But with all different choices in the marketplace, it's difficult to know which one will be the best fit for you and your strategic vision. Imagine having the peace of mind that your business is backed by the right technology investments that are tailored for your specific needs. Hi, I'm Brian Nichols and I've helped countless business owners and technology professionals just like you helping you make informed decisions about what technologies are best to invest in for your business. Voice bandwidth, cybersecurity, business continuity, juggling all the aspects of business technology is messy. Let me help at the Brian Nichols show.com forward slash help and sign up for a free one on one consultation with yours truly to dig deep into where you see your company headed and how we can align your business technology towards those goals. Again, that's the Brian Nichols show.com forward slash ELP. To get your simplified business technology started today, instead of focusing on winning arguments, we're teaching the basic fundamentals of sales and marketing and how we can use them to win in the world of politics, teaching you how to meet people where they're at on the issues they care about. Welcome to The Brian Nichols Show. Well, happy Monday there, folks, Brian Nichols here on The Brian Nichols Show. And oh boy, boy, you are in store for of course, another fun filled episode. And I am as always your humble host. Today we have a recurring guest. And I'm so excited to have him back on the show. You know him? Because he talks about finding the why and why people buy Victor Antonio, welcome back to The Brian Nichols Show.

Victor Antonio  
Wow, you actually want to be back on the show. That's amazing, man. Thank you believe

Brian Nichols  
it or not, Victor, not only did I want you back on the show, a lot of people in the audience, I daresay hundreds wanted you back on the show, because I constantly hear now a little sneak peek. By the way. B if you go back to the original intro of The Brian Nichols Show back last year, that is you were the beginning of the intro. He was talking about what we're trying to do. We're not trying to you know, go ahead and push a product. We're not trying to push a service or a solution, but rather we're trying to help sell change. And people love that. And I think people are starting to realize that there is a very similar world between the world of sales in the private sector, but also in the world of selling politics. So that's where I've been focusing. That's I know, I've been having a lot of success. And people said, Brian, go get more people like Victor Beck in the show, actually, can we get Victor back on the show? So here we are. And we're gonna talk about your new book, which she just wrote the mastering the upsell. And that's where I think we sometimes drop the ball, the world of politics, we'll get somebody on board, they'll get on board with ideas, and then there's kind of fizzle out. So maybe we can talk about upselling that doesn't have to be politically focused today, but just across the board, and we can obviously draw the world of politics. But before we get there, Victor, a quick reintroduction, if you would, to The Brian Nichols Show audience, how have you been? Number one? And number two, what's been going on in the world of Victor Antonio?

Victor Antonio  
Well, I think you know, one of the best things I've seen is the activity in the world of speaking for me in training, right? So we're starting to see more live events. So people are getting away from virtual so the calendar is filling up for live events. And I'm super excited about that. Obviously, the release of the new book mastering the upsell in January, super excited about that as well. new courses on the sales velocity Academy super excited about that. And inflation not excited about

Brian Nichols  
No, nobody's excited about inflation, quantitative

Victor Antonio  
easing two words, two words that can cause a lot of damage

Brian Nichols  
if only people had trusted those experts as Victor. Oh, yeah.

Victor Antonio  
Oh, yeah. It's uh, you know, it's funny, because the it all impacts sales, right? Everything. I mean, you see today, the one of the things that I'm training a lot on is training salespeople on how to have a price increase conversation. So I've been posting stuff online on YouTube. Because now you know, you got to go back and tell your customers your prices are going up? And how do you have those conversations, and not to digress from, you know, mastering the upsell, but I think it's worth noting that that is one of the biggest things that that people are asking for now is how do I go back and tell them, it's going to cost you more?

Brian Nichols  
Yep, well, not only is it going to cost you more, it's gonna continue to probably keep costing more. So we're gonna have to get comfortable with upselling in the world of the private sector. And, frankly, if we're going to want to continue to grow in the the world of politics, he has an upsell there as well. So let's talk about that Victor, mastering the upsell. Now, in your book, I correct me if I'm wrong, that 16 strategies, yeah, you've outlined 16 strategies that you can go ahead and implement. But before we implement strategies, we have to understand the idea of upselling. So let's dig into this. What is upselling? And how does it look in the world of sales?

Victor Antonio  
So absolutely, the simplest way to explain upselling versus crossing right so if you want a single burger and you go to a double burger that's upsell or a triple burger that's upselling. If you want fries with that, that's a cross sell. In other words, you add something That's not vertically integrated to what you're selling. And I started looking at the world of upselling. Because one of the things I came across a study just about two years ago, when I came across a study was like, you can increase your revenue. And I have this in the book buy up to 30%, by just focusing on existing clients. So that's a number that's a metric to take away 30% By focusing on existing clients. The other thing that the other aha moment I had this was after I wrote the book just kind of validated, I was talking to a company, large energy company. They do power supplies for like, you know, cellular towers, you know, anything has to do with wireless communications. And after, during the after the pandemic after 2021 Going into 2022, one of the conversations we had was, how are your sales? And he says, Look, Victor is two things are happening right now, our sales are down 10%. He said, but our profitability is incredible, because our cost of sales have gone through the floor. Because my salespeople aren't traveling, they're not spending a lot of money on the road, so forth, and so on. So my cost of sales literally gone down. And that reinforce why upselling is a great strategy, especially now. Because if you're selling to your existing clients, there is no sales cycle, right? So there's time saving there. In terms of access to the actual decision makers, well, you already sold them. So you have access. But the fascinating part was that the cost of sales in general going down, therefore, why not go and sell to existing clients, even virtually, that can be done?

Brian Nichols  
Let's talk about the cost of x, or the I'm sorry, the customer acquisition costs, because you have a chapter there as you start things off, you talk about there's the the customer acquisition cost versus the LTV, the lifetime value, what does that look like? And why is that important when we're talking about upselling?

Victor Antonio  
Yeah, well, first of all, let me back up cuz I started the whole story with the acre of diamonds stories, right? The acre of diamonds story is, is a story, you can look it up online. It's basically a story where a farmer who lives in Africa is told about diamond mines. And he says, I'm gonna sell my farm and go gets, you know, go find these diamonds, I can just live forever and have legacy after me. And he winds up finding no diamonds and toes himself off the cliff. How tragic right. And so the the guy who bought the actual farm discovers these big black rocks in the backyard. And it turns out, these were actual diamonds. In other words, they were diamond in a rough form. And the back, I just say the back of the house was filled along the creek with all these black rocks, which turned out to be diamonds. Now, what's interesting is that the original farmer didn't know what diamonds really look like he only saw them in their final stages all polished up and pretty. So first of all, he didn't recognize that he had acres of diamonds in his backyard, so to speak. And I love that analogy, because upselling if you have an existing customer base is like an acres of diamonds. In other words, you have acres of diamonds, customers who will buy more from you, if you just realize that they're back, they're ready to buy. Having said that, the cost of acquisition the client acquisition causes How much does it take you how much time more specifically money does it take you? What does it cost you acquire new client. And if your cost of acquisition cost is you know, is high, then get upselling will drive that cost down. Now also customer lifetime value. Now the customer lifetime value is if you buy from me the first time, Brian, how long are you going to continue to buy from me in the book I talk about? I think a Starbucks has a 20 year measurement for customer lifetime value? In other words, do you start buying Starbucks, typically the customer stays with them for 20 years? Right? So now two numbers, we need to know, what does it cost to acquire client? And if I acquire the client, what are they going to buy over a given period of time, that's their customer lifetime value. Now, if your customer acquisition cost is lower than your customer lifetime value, that's always a good deal, right? Because it costs you you know, X amount, but you got x plus amount over the next so many years. So I think those are two variables to keep in mind. And how does it tie and tie in to upselling? Again, I'm trying to drive your cost of acquisition costs down. And one of the best ways of doing that, again, I'm repeating myself is to go after existing clients.

Brian Nichols  
I think we you're focusing on this, which I like because we don't think about too often that the aspect of lowering the actual costs of going out. I mean, I lead a sales development team for three years. And I look back and you look at the main costs a lot is the time the energy and the effort of actually going out and prospecting. So to your point, if you can go ahead and eliminate that and you already have people who are not just know who you are, what they know, like and trust you already just seems like a common sense place to start now, to begin that conversation. It can be a little uncomfortable. I see that a lot where business owners say hey, I've already built this strong relationship. I'm making the you know, the build of the value. I showed how I differentiate and I saw problems and I asked for the sale and they said yes, but I feel uncomfortable asking for more. Don't I come across as greedy Victor?

Victor Antonio  
Well, no good. We talked about this last time Brian, that The job of the salesperson is to sell value. So if somebody questions that what they're selling us, you mean, I should go back and sell them more? No, we don't go back and sell more, we go back and help more, we add more value to what we've already sold. So, you know, delete that statement, you know, not you bribe, but just whoever has that statement, just, you know, delete that they because it makes no sense. If you're selling something that's worthwhile, why not keep selling them more of it, if it's helping their business grow, value for value, maybe value for value,

Brian Nichols  
talk about the propensity to buy

Victor Antonio  
the profesi device, it's, you know, again, it's, there's people who are willing to pay what you have to offer. And I'll give you a broad stroke of what I like about propensity to buy, without diving too deep into it, the propensity buys, figuring out who's willing to buy from you, this is kind of obvious, right? And again, I'm gonna tie back to upselling, keep it real strict in that channel. And that is, the propensity to buy is very high when you're selling to existing clients. So why not again, exercise that, why not go after that existing business. And as I go through the different strategies, which I'm sure we'll talk about a few of those, you'll begin to see that if people are willing to buy there is a propensity to buy, then why not sell to them, but again, we don't sell we sell value. And if they can make more money, reduce their costs, increase revenue, expand their market share, you know the deal, then why not do it, keep selling?

Brian Nichols  
So let's go into some of these, these strategies. The first one, it struck me funny, the freemium to premium, I laughed, and you did have a line that I have to read out loud, because it's so true. And you see this in the idea of the cost of being free, free is never free, there is always always a trade off. Is that not true in life, in politics, in business, but everywhere, right, but let's talk about that the free freemium to premium, how does that work in the world of upsells?

Victor Antonio  
Oh, my God, we're victims of this like, especially with only subscriptions we have with all the SAS products, right? I think I use Dropbox is a perfect example of, you know, freemium to premium, they'll give you like, I don't know, 10 gig, I forgot what it was 50 gig for free, what happens if you start loading up, you know, you start uploading stuff into Dropbox, and then you realize you run out of capacity. And there's different strategies that companies use to kind of say, Okay, you need to buy more. And so then all of a sudden, you just got to go to premium. So you got to actually buy something. So again, you start out free, but you want to buy, and it reminded me of the Costco model, which I used, I think in the actual book, where you go to Costco, and they give you a sample of food, hoping that you'll buy, you know, the actual product, no different a lot of these software companies, SAS companies, you know, software, as a service companies will say, hey, try our software, use it for a while, if you like it great. If not, you know, that's fine, but it's free, what's not free, because once you start loading it up, all of a sudden, it's very difficult for you to get off that platform. And I talked about that's called sunk cost. You've invested so much into Facebook, for example. And I think that's the one I use as far as, you know, if it's free, you're the product, I think that's the line I use, if the products free, you're the product. And so, you know, a lot of people can't take down their Facebook account, because they've invested so much Instagram, whatever Snapchat, you've put so much content on there that letting go becomes at heart. But again, if you want to use more of the services, for example, back to Dropbox, now I need more memory, more storage, rather. So guess what? I'm paying 99? No, I'm paying $129 a year. So I went from free to $129 a year. Well done. Dropbox well does surprise,

Brian Nichols  
surprise, surprise. I gotcha. No, don't worry, everybody. I think listening is nodding an agreement like oh, yeah, I have at least one or two subscriptions that are just like that. So and maybe it leads to the next strategy that we focus on decision fatigue. And we see this in the world of politics, Victor Oh, my gosh, decision, fatigue is rampant. But let's talk about this in you tell a story of one of your customers. It's Michael Moore, not that Michael Moore folks different Michael Moore, a successful pool owner.

Victor Antonio  
I'm thinking about not that Michael. And let me see if I could recall the numbers off the top of my head. I know the story in general. But he had sold a pool. And I think it was like $80,000, right? He sold the pool $80,000. And then he up sold the person, I think another $40,000 Or like a 50% upgrade. So now he closed the deal at 120. Double check my numbers. And he's super happy. And this is a true story. I'm talking to this guy. And we're like in Guatemala doing an event and he's telling me the story. And then he says he goes then I found out like a month or two later that he bought like $30,000 worth of patio furniture from one of my competitors. And I'm like, Why didn't I grab that? $30,000 at the same time? And I said to him, I said, Well, we went back and forth. I said, No, no, I said, people get tired of making decisions. And so actually looked up, you know, like getting tired of making decisions or something. And sure enough, there's something called decision fatigue, which people get tired of making decisions. They're like, and we've all been through that right Brian? You're like, you know you're there like in a car you're buying a house or whatever. Have you bought some, you know, for a new bathroom, like, you get to a point where you go, you know what? Okay, that's it. That's all. Let's just stop right here, let's just go ahead and sign the deal. Let's get this done. Let's get started. But then, after you close that deal, right? You give it another, let's say, a week, two weeks, three weeks, whatever the time period is, then you're ready to make new decisions. And knowing that is what Michael Moore miss, he could have just closed the deal at 120. And then maybe gone back two or three weeks later, after the person is ready to make new decisions, after they've recovered from the fatigue, like being tired, and then actually sold them. So now I'm advocating to clients, have you sold somebody, and you can tell that they tapped out? I'm making decisions. What you should include, as part of your process is, when do we go back for another bite at the apple, so to speak, to add more value. And by the way, that's, by the way, this example is a good example of what that person said earlier about, you know, going back and selling them more notice that the person this time when and asked for more, right? Perfect example of some value, don't keep bought. Yeah,

Brian Nichols  
well, and I mean, just to take a little quick segue to my day job. I mean, I work in the world of not just cybersecurity, and voice and data and weighing architecture, but just general business technology. So if you go in and you're saying, Okay, I have a voice solution I'm selling today, you make the sale, and then you go on your happy way that Ron didn't mean to that to happen. But then you move forward, right? And you don't go back and say, Hey, by the way, have you looked at things for your sock and sim solutions? Have you done penetration testing, they are likely actively looking for and they frankly might not know that you offer that service. So being able to tell them and quite frankly, educate, enlighten, and inform them that will in its own nature help lead them to see Oh, wow. Victor can help me in other areas. I didn't know he could help me. And I think it's funny. You mentioned bathroom project in your last response. Well, that's actually where I was going to in number 11, which was a reframing value, you talk about a bathroom project that you and your wife are doing. And one of the the ladies at Lowe's caught you off guard when you were asking for paint? Because it wasn't that the paint that she talked about, or the paint rather that you brought to her? It wasn't in stock, but rather she said you shouldn't maybe not get that paint. Why was that? Victor?

Victor Antonio  
Yeah. Well, it was interesting, because, you know, and I want to highlight this, because what that person did to us was basically, first of all, they told us no, you know, you don't want to do that. And they position themselves as an expert, because then they went on to explain why for a little bit more, you should buy Why paint. And I love that example. Because what clients want today, let's tie this into decision fatigue. Also, bribe clients have so much information in front of them that they're having a hard time making a buying decision. So there's decision fatigue, and then there's decision apathy, because like, I can't decide, right, because they don't want to have any buyers regret, and what the market wants today, you tell me if I'm wrong, Brian, because if you're in the business of selling cybersecurity, I you know, it, you know, sushi in the background, I know, you understand what about, say, what people want is for you to help them. You know, Brett Adams said use the word make sense of what's in front of them, because they're confused, because they got too many options. So our job much like that, ladies, the paint example, Her job was to clarify what we really needed or what we really wanted. And she wasn't afraid to do that. And so I'll throw this question back at you. Do you find that customers today really want you to kind of not hold their hand but guide them to maybe the right solution?

Brian Nichols  
Oh, absolutely. Because they're terrified. What happens if they make the wrong decision? We've seen this, this blew me away, I was sitting down with one of the the CEOs of our vendor. For a cybersecurity vendor. We work with Doug out in the east coast this past weekend. And we're sitting down and he goes, You know, it's crazy, Brian, is that last year, you saw, I think the number of 110% increase in ransomware in cybersecurity attacks. And yet, when you look at those companies that were hit, 75% of them had an existing endpoint, manage MDR solution, so that they already had something in place that was supposed to protect them, and it didn't work. So that speaks to a lot of people are looking to get away from okay, I checked my box too, okay, I need to make sure that I'm not just checking the box, I need to make sure that I'm putting cybersecurity not as a product, but rather as a service as a solution. So now when they're going out, and they're saying I need help doing this, they're looking for someone who's not pushing a product, but rather in the case that I find myself in being able to have a conversation and say, Hey, let's talk about what are the top areas of concern. Let's dig into what you've done in the past, what's worked, what hasn't worked, what fears you have what compliance sees you might have to address all these different things that are on their plate, and then to be able to find the right solution. for them that's going to meet their needs. And that is such a, it's such a better conversation, it's a much more refreshing conversation, because they, they're now in the process of not trying to find a product to solve that fear. But now they're in the the mentality of, oh, this person has my genuine best interests in mind. And am I, and along the way, you're gonna naturally find that the sale just kind of happens. It just kind of makes sense.

Victor Antonio  
It really it's a natural progression. And, you know, I was trying to define, I don't know why, what mental exercise I was going through, but I was trying to define the word Trust, because we, if we can develop trust with the customer, we can accelerate the sales process, I think I was trying to figure out how to shorten the sales cycle. And trust is the best lubricant to closing a deal, right? I should put a shirt on that trust is the best lubricant to closing a deal. Yeah, sure. That's a gold mine. Okay. Anyway, back to the point. So I've defined trust, and it has three variables, I want to see if it passes The Brian Nichols Show, with test, okay, for you to build trust, the first thing you have to do is it's the empathy piece. And you have to take the customer's point of view, we'll call that you got to take the customer's point of view really empathize what they're going through number two, you got to also also I say, plus, so point of view, plus, you have to position yourself as a subject matter expert, like they go, Ah, this guy guy knows what they're talking about. Right? I believe them. But the third component, well, the big one you just mentioned. And the third one, so we got point of view, plus, I'll call it SME subject matter expert. Plus, I call it the BIM be I am, you have to have their best interest in mind. In other words, when the customer senses that you really are concerned about them, you're not trying to reach into their pockets to grab more money, or wallet share. What you're trying to do is, look, I have your best interests in mind. And the best example of this is, I think, the example in the book I talk about a guy who I take my Volvo to, that's not 22 years old, right? His name is James. And James has mastered the art. But he does is out of out of caring for his customers. He's mastered the art of down selling, he's the guy that will tell me no, you don't need that. You don't need to do this. But that right there you need to do, and we're going to do it, like whoa. And I realized that this guy cares more about my car than I do. Now think about that the guy cares more about my car than I do. And when you feel that you're like, you trust him. Over the years, he's literally call me looking at your car. Here's what I thought that that you don't need to do that. Put that on your radar, though. But right here, we're gonna do this. The only question I have is, how much is that going to cost me and use that go? Ouch. Okay, but fix it. And all of a sudden, that's what customers want. Take your point of view, be a subject matter expert, demonstrate that you know what you're talking about, and keep their best interest in mind.

Brian Nichols  
Yep. And I always joke that like sales and marketing are like ugly step sisters, but at the same point in time, they are and they're super important. But they're they are separate, right? So you should know when you're when we're having these conversations, who your target market is, and you should already be speaking to that person. So you're speaking their language, you know, what their their fears are, you know, what's driving them who they are as an individual, what their their your, we say the buyer persona, what that looks like, you really want to make sure that you're you're going through this sales process in that mentality with that person and not doing it after the fact. And when you're sitting down with the person, you're like, oh, wow, you're not qualified. You're not the person who makes decisions. And by the way, if you actually get to the point where you're sitting down with someone, and you're talking about these issues, you need to start back maybe going back and focusing on and is the last point when focusing on make it a process. So let's make it real. And this is where in cybersecurity solutions, Business Technology Solutions, it gets tough because people get afraid of changing the status quo, upsetting that proverbial applecart having something happen that goes wrong, and then then be the ones that have to go through the blame. So let's talk about this. Let's remedy those fears of that one CEO who's concerned that upselling is going to just destroy his entire client base. Let's make it a process Victor, How's that look like and let's make it real.

Victor Antonio  
It's, I'm blown away that people would think that upselling is going to upset the applecart. I don't understand, you know, I'm like, my brain has a hard time just socializing that thought. It's one of those only mean, if you're just trying to help, like when you were talking about your example, about the customer, that your son cybersecurity, then you added services around like penetration tests and things of that nature, right? You're trying to help them make sure that as you pointed out that their endpoints are protected. And so that's not I mean, it is upselling but it's also trying to help the customer I know I'm beating the drum on this because if you understand that you're selling value that you don't have a problem going back to the well, because again, if you come to me right and you sell me something Then, and I started using it I go works. And then you show to my doors. Victor, I got something else that works. You want to look at it? What do you think about someone go? Yeah, what do you got? You don't like a drug dealer right there? Yeah. What do you got? Now? What do you got? Because I mean, that's the mentality of sales. If you really believe in your product, you'll think that way. So I'm led to believe that people who are afraid of upselling don't believe in the value of what they're selling. And what they do think is that what I'm selling isn't worth the price that I'm asking my clients for. So there is a bad belief system that a lot of salespeople have. So I don't think it's upsetting the applecart. I'm thinking penetration rate, if I can use your phrase, or penetration for wallet share, right? How do we get more out of that client? I don't know if I answered your question. But I did want to add something to your statement earlier about marketing and sales. I'm gonna make a controversial statement I think I made last time is that I think I used to laugh at marketing, like what do they do? Do they even have a job, right? And today, I really believe that marketing has a bigger role. And I think I just saw, there's a study that just came out by McKinsey, this will blow your mind. This is like a 2022. We're talking. This just came out like last month. So they asked b2b buyers, you know, how much would you buy online? Like what's your what's the value that you're willing to buy online? And the first price point was $50,000. Right? Would you buy something worth $50,000? Online? And I think the number was 65 67% says, Yeah, I would buy something that's $50,000. Online, boom, like, wow, that's a big number. And I think I'm being conservative. I think it's hard, but I know it's at least 65. And then they asked, What about $500,000, half 1,000,020% said they would buy something and a half a million online, I don't know about you, that's a mind blower. This is what's happened to the pandemic has created this. I mean, we were on our way to a digital transformation, kind of maybe going with little 45 degree trajectory. But the pandemics had go 90 degrees, let's get there. And all of a sudden, you're starting to see these big deals. I mean, people are buying houses online. Now, you know, you've seen this right without seeing them, right, just going out pitch they buying cars. So the market is shifting. And I just wanted to highlight that because I think that's important that people are now on their own customer journey, finding what they want, and they're willing to pay more online without actually meeting with the salesperson. That is not to say, Brian, because I know he's going to hit the panic button, you're going to say, oh my god, does that mean b2b sales is over? No. I think when you look at the spectrum of selling, simple to complex, within the medium to complex, you'll always have a need for b2b salespeople, who are subject matter experts that will always have a role. If they know their product and their market and their client.

Brian Nichols  
Does it mean like everything in life, the only constant is change. And I think we're going to see and we are seeing, frankly, that marketing is taking on more of the if you will the the prospecting robots, not prospecting is more, so a better understanding of who the target market is. And with that, being able to go after those individuals more precisely. I mean, you mentioned Facebook, if you're not paying for the product, you are the product. Well, quite literally, in Facebook's case, your data is the product. And that's in many cases, how marketing has been able to go after you specifically, when you have a product that you're like, I just talked about that with my wife, why am I getting an ad for that, but I actually do need this. And that right there? The actually I do need this, that's a conversation to your point that more and more people are willing to say, Okay, well, I'm gonna go ahead and buy it online. And when you see what you're seeing with the subject matter experts, that role is turning more into that consultative, you know, let me help address the fears. Yeah, can't have answered with the frequently asked questions. By the

Victor Antonio  
way, that right there. I mean, you know, right on the proverbial head, the we're going back, it's almost like history repeats itself back in the 1970s, a guy by the name of Mack hand and wrote a book consultative selling. We're going back to that, again, I'm telling you, we're going back to consultative selling. And it's interesting because I've worked with a client now. And I'm literally reading, consultative selling, and I'm reading one called the discipline of market leaders, which came out I think, in the late 80s, early 90s. I think it was like 9091. So that's, what 30 years ago. And if you read this book, Brian, you're like, this could have been written yesterday. Because it's talking about what's happening today. You would think with all this technology, people can make decisions on their own but know the complexity in your business, specifically cybersecurity, I can only imagine the the the the number of permutations solutions that you can provide your customers. So now you have to it's all bespoke, right? You have to customize it. Yep. And so again, I think people who will get take the customer's point of view to have their best interests in mind, but are subject matter experts on Top of that are going to be the winning salespeople, you know moving forward.

Brian Nichols  
Well, folks, if you have found the the tips, the strategies, very useful, I'm going to ask you to do me a favor. Did you know you can find this awesome book available over on amazon.com? Yes, the rumor is true. I will make sure I include the links in the show notes. But if for you audio listener, yes, the book is mastering the upsell. And Victor as always, we want folks to go ahead if they want to not only learn more about you, but go ahead and give you a shout. We're gonna go ahead and do so.

Victor Antonio  
Victor, Antonio, just go Victor Antonio, calm at Victor Antonio, I'm all over the place. But check out the book the book is, first of all, it's reasonably priced. But what I love about the book is that it's chock full you went through it broad so you can attest this. It's tactics, real stuff that you can use in the real world. It's very light on theory, in terms of like fluffy stories, you know, and anecdotes. It's really like, here's the strategy. Here's how you can implement it. It's almost like a buffet ala carte. Take what you want. Leave what you don't want.

Brian Nichols  
Yeah. Isn't that one of your favorite lines that the Bruce Lee the Bruce Lee quote? Yeah,

Victor Antonio  
absorb what is useful? Discard what is not an add what is uniquely yours? There you go. Boy, do you know me? Well, Brian.

Brian Nichols  
It's not like I listened to your podcast or anything, Victor. Oh, no. And you know what I think and I'll wrap with this too, because this is the first episode I've done since I was over on Tim Poole show. And we had a great conversation and we talked about oh my goodness, all sorts of fun things. Make sure you Oh, yeah. Tim Poole, Tim. Tim. Oh, man. Okay. Folks, please email Victor who Tim Poole has no template. He's one of the top podcasters Top YouTubers in the country, I think.

Victor Antonio  
I feel like really dominates all recorded. No, ah,

Brian Nichols  
but no, he talks to a very different audience. And in my audience, I mean, yes, we have some political folks here and a lot of business folks and sales folks. And I was able to bridge that world that the politics bridge the world of sales, and to bring that perspective to his audience. And hopefully, we can help change the conversation. I think that the part there in that Bruce, Bruce Lee quote, the uniquely yours What is uniquely yours, that's the uniquely yours approach we're taking here at the show. I know over on your program and what you're doing focusing on upselling. And talking about, I mean, goodness me who wants to go out and talk actively about how we can talk about increasing prices on customers. And yet, Victor, it's an important conversation that you know, that the people are out there having right now. So let's go ahead and show them how to do it. So we're having the important conversations being unique and doing so. And I think we're showing that there is a very, very real demand for doing things differently. But in many cases, a lot of the ways that we're doing things differently is just doing the things that work and those things that work happened to be some of the things have been around for quite a long time. So I know I'm keeping you longer than we had promised. But Victor has been an absolute pleasure. With that being said, Folks, please do me a favor. I will include all the links in the show notes if you enjoy the episode. Well, number one, please obviously share today's episode with family and friends. But number two, please go ahead. Give Victor a follow. And also please go ahead and pick up your copy of mastering the upsell by the one and only Victor Antonio. But that being said, it's Brian Nichols signing off. You're on The Brian Nichols Show. We'll see you tomorrow. Thanks for listening to The Brian Nichols Show. Find more episodes at the Brian Nichols show.com If you enjoyed today's episode, don't forget to subscribe. Want to help us reach more people? Give the show a five star review and tell your friends to subscribe to find us the Brian Nichols show.com and download the show on Apple podcast, Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Follow me on social media at V. Nichols liberty and consider donating to the show at Brian Nichols show.com forward slash support. The Brian Nichols Show is supported by viewers like you. Thank you to our patrons Darryl Schmitz, Michael Lima, Michel Mankiewicz, holy John's Craig, the caster and the we're libertarians network.

Eric Brakey  
This is renegade statesman Eric Breakey, host of Free America now a podcast for people ready to strike down tyranny. As a former state legislator who knows how the political machine works. I lead every episode with a free range discussion alongside thinkers, activists and policymakers. People like Tom woods, Hannah Cox and WWE superstar and Knox County Mayor Glenn Kane Jacobs on just how to free America now. New episodes are released every day, Monday through Friday, and you can find free America now on your favorite podcasting app. So be sure to subscribe, unless you're a communist, in which case I understand why you wouldn't really like the show. Furthermore, my opinion is the Federal Reserve should be destroyed. So let's Free America now

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Victor Antonio Profile Photo

Victor Antonio

International Sales Trainer, Speaker, and Sales Executive

A poor upbringing from one of the roughest areas of Chicago didn't stop Victor from earning a B.S. Electrical Engineering, an MBA and building a 20-year career as a top sales executive and becoming President of Global Sales and Marketing for a $420M company.

As Vice President of International Sales in a Fortune 500, he was selected from over 500 sales managers to join the President's Advisory Council for excellence in sales and management.

He has shared the stage with top business speakers: Daymond John (Shark Tank), Rudy Giuliani, Paul Otellini (CEO of Intel), and John May (CEO of FedEx Kinkos).
He's the author of 13 books on sales and motivation and recently launched the Sales Mastery Academy learning platform with 350+ videos. He recently published his new book, "Sales Ex Machina: How Arti cial Intelligence is Changing the World of Selling".