April 6, 2022

475: Elon Musk - The New King of Twitter? (with Eric Brakey from Free American Now)

475: Elon Musk - The New King of Twitter? (with Eric Brakey from Free American Now)

"Brian Nichols (host of the "Brian Nichols Show"), fresh off his appearance on "Timcast IRL" joins Free America Now to discuss parental rights in education and Elon Musk, the new King of Twitter."


From Eric Brakey's Free America Now Podcast!

 

"Brian Nichols (host of the "Brian Nichols Show"), fresh off his appearance on "Timcast IRL" joins Free America Now to discuss parental rights in education and Elon Musk, the new King of Twitter."

 

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Transcript

Eric Brakey  
lockdowns, mass surveillance Forever War. Is this still the land of the free? It will be again. I'm Eric Reiki and it's time to free America now, because an idea whose time has come cannot be stopped by any army or any government. Can it be stopped? I don't think it can be stopped. This idea whose time has come. It's here right now. It's free America now. I'm your host and Renegade statesman Eric breaky. Welcome to Episode 134. Of course, as always, hosted by me your renegade statesman. And today we have back on the show my friend, host of The Brian Nichols Show. What is his name? Of course, it's Brian Nichols.

Brian Nichols  
Money. Hey, wait. 134 episodes already

Eric Brakey  
134 We just had Horton on last week, talking about everything that was going on in Russia and Ukraine. Of course, when like Horton's on it's always like, it's not so much of a conversation as much as like, you just got to let the guy go. He has a wealth of wealth of knowledge. So yeah, 134 episodes.

Brian Nichols  
No kidding. Well, congratulations from Yes, yours truly over The Brian Nichols Show. Congratulate I know, we talked like when you were getting ready to do this, you were mapping out free America now. And we were on the phone there for oh my goodness, how many weeks we're going back and forth. And you're asking ideas and questions and stuff. And I like to see where you are now from where we originally were talking. Like, man, that's awesome. Congratulations.

Eric Brakey  
Well, it's nice. And I don't think we've had you on the show since we spun off and gone independent. But we're independent now. And but you had some big stuff going on in your podcasting world? I did. I just see that you are on. Tim cast IRL?

Brian Nichols  
Yes, sir. Yeah, um, I was floored, reached out to Lydia back like two years ago, a year ago and the COVID stuff had happened. I was doing some work with these guys over a PR as a PR guy for his follow the science, they're doing a docu series. And at the time, we were really looking to get them on some some podcasts. So I had reached out to Lady up. And I know she was swamped. So didn't hear back and you know, it was his, whatever it was, and then fast forward to about three weeks ago, and she she responded back, she's like, Hey, you know, a year plus later, sorry about that completely missed it. By the way, would you be interested in coming on Tim cast? I was like, Oh my god. Sure. Um, and of course, like, you know, there's no set topic to discuss. It's, you know, talk about whatever the news is gonna be on that day. So, you know, going out there they are based in the greater DC area, it was a trip to get out there. So being out in Indiana now, it's not quick little two hour excursion. Now. It's a whole, you know, planning to do to leave the place. And it worked out well, because we ended up my wife had her sister's bachelorette party. In Philadelphia, I got to see the day job the HQ out there. So hang out there. And yeah, then got to hang out with Tim cast. And dude, it was absolutely surreal. I'm still still in like going a million miles a minute in my head. Like, I don't remember half the things we went over just because it was so fast paced. But it's been it's been great to hear the feedback from from folks, not just in the liberty movement. But like folks, I used to work with, you know, in the fitness world, I haven't talked to in 10 years reaching out and saying hi, like, just stuff like that it kind of catches you off guard, you're like, you know, there, there are more people out there who are open to our message that we're not really paying attention to, but they're paying attention to us. And if we just speak to them, they're ready to make a switch. They're ready to make a change. And I'm really finding like that kind of has been proven true over the past week or so now that I'm getting back into the swing of things after getting back from my East Coast trip.

Eric Brakey  
Well, that's awesome. I mean, getting on Tim cast. That's big leagues right there. Like, boy, you're moving up to the major leagues, Brian.

Brian Nichols  
Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I was blown away like the fact that me like little, little old me got asked to go out and be on Tim cast IRL. Yeah, it was very surreal. Eric still is very surreal thing to be very honest with you.

Eric Brakey  
Well, I think it's probably a good lesson and just kind of the the importance of you throw fishing lines out there. And you never know where you're going to get a bite. You put your mane you reached out to them two years ago. And then just all of a sudden you get a nibble on that line. And you get a big fish there. So now that's awesome. And it's he's got like, what was his audience? Like? He gets like 400,000 an episode

Brian Nichols  
or something? Yeah, something like that. Yeah, I think the episode on youtube I lucked out. We were ballpark like 350k. Somewhere in there. I'm not sure if the actual podcast though.

Eric Brakey  
Yeah. Well, that's awesome. And it's like studios out in West Virginia, right? Yes. Yep. Okay, what's that? What what was West Virginia like?

Brian Nichols  
us there for about 12 hours if that um yeah, got there around like four or so in the afternoon, went to Harpers Ferry and got a quick bite to eat. And then I was actually at the studio for about five hours. You know, from the time you get there, you go to the greenroom, you hang out, then we had a little mic check pre pre show, just hanging out talking, then the show itself is two hours. Plus, then afterwards you have an hour hour or so of his Patreon special for supporting listeners. It's not Patreon but supporting listeners. So yeah, like ends up being you know, we you're not done until 1111 30. At night, get back to the hotel is a b&b, you get to just chill for maybe 1520 minutes, try it wind down and I had to be on the road to go up to Philadelphia that morning at five in the morning. So I was literally back up ready to roll at five and we were buzzing. So I had worked the next day, you know, I was at work entire day doing calls and stuff. So yeah, that was that was an experience. But it was I mean, how was West Virginia? It was nice. It was beautiful. And I understand why, you know, it's such a nice tourist location because like, it looks like you're walking to colonial 1700 It's wild.

Eric Brakey  
Yeah. I remember when I was younger, I was to like a mission trip with my church to like build houses and like almost heaven, West Virginia. And it's like, boy, I could understand how you call a place like this almost heaven. It is beautiful out there. And and very interesting politically, you know, just like, you know, I guess in some ways, I guess it's a lot like, like, like Tim himself, you know, a bunch of like, former Democrats disenchanted with the Democrat Party who say they're never going back

Brian Nichols  
yet. Well, you know, what, Eric, that? I know, we were like, We don't know, we're gonna talk about today. But I think we found it because like that, that ended up being one of the main talking points of conversation was the fact that you've seen the left really start to make these hard nosed approaches to, in any cases, radical social issues, radical culture issues. And for a while, and I was actually just think about us in the car today, like, for, I would say, 1015 years or so. It was pretty much like you you had to go along to get along. You were always afraid of getting canceled. You were afraid to if you said something negative. So like the conversation ended up really focusing on Tim cast towards the Florida bill. Right? They don't say gaming, they don't say gay bill that actually says you can't say that you can't say Don't say gay. But when we started talking about how the position of the left had now gotten to they having to explain not teaching. Regardless if it's you know, transgender, isn't it just sexuality in general to K through third graders. And I was talking about how Ron DeSantis did a really smart political maneuver when he made that the context of the Florida bill, because now instead of us constantly seeing the the right, almost going along with the narrative for fear of being canceled now and they're taking that that true stance, you know, here, no, no, we're gonna draw a line. And now it's forcing the left to almost have to rationalize and explain away where they are in their positioning. So the now you're to the point and I say this a lot over my show, when you're explaining you're losing. And now the left is having to explain to people why they are in and not just talking about the transgenderism issue, but they're okay with teaching kids kindergarteners, sexuality, that and that's a conversation that your parents are like your average parent is going to have and be like, no, no, no, I'm out. Because like, if we're going to have that conversation with a child, at least let me be the person that the parent to be the one deciding that. So going back to you, Tim and the rest of the team, a lot of them, yes, are disaffected Democrats, and I think we're finding a lot of people are turning into disaffected Democrats, because now they're realizing, Oh, the Democratic Party that I signed up for whether it was, you know, your grandparents who were all about, you know, the JFK, Democrat, if it was your, maybe your parents who were like, I'm a Bill Clinton, Democrat, minus the, you know, the, whatever the definition of his his, or maybe they were looking to state, you know, as being Obama, Democrat, all those things that used to represent what a Democrat was, I mean, if you were to take Obama's positions in 2008, and his platform and put it on mainstream democratic talking points for 2022, to be looked at as a moderate Republican. So you've seen that the the left has really started to drive more and more to that hyper partisan and cultural leftism, and your average person is not on board with that. And as we start to see the left, almost double down and plant their flag on this hill that they're going to die on. I don't See ending? Well for them just as just as we saw, you know, in the past where the left has been able to steamroll over these positions now, they can't do that they can't steamroll past this position, because now more people are standing against the the wokeness against the insanity. And they're starting to say no.

Eric Brakey  
Yeah, you know, it really is interesting. When you think about it, you go back to like, you talk about, like, where Obama was in 2008, in terms of what the messaging was, and it was like, anti war, right. Pro civil liberties. Yeah, there was a lot of like big spending big government stuff. But the stuff that really excited people was a lot of the, you know, frankly, all libertarian stuff that was in his platform that he promptly abandoned as soon as he got elected. And ever since the Democratic Party has become the pro war party, the party of you know, it's it. I mean, Obama went from being the civil liberties guy to the guy was secret kill lists, assassinating American citizens in other parts of the world who had never been convicted or tried in a court of law. I mean, yeah, it's the the party is really abandoned a lot. And now the social issues, you know, it is, I guess, the, you know, the, the, I guess, what are they called the parental rights bill? I don't want to refer to by the Democratic talking points. Yep. But I remember and maybe you saw this, but at this, I remember seeing this it was like an interview in the media with some guy who's like a kindergarten teacher who's who's gay. And he was saying he was scared of this bill, because he was worried that he wouldn't be able to talk to his his garden students, his kids. Yeah, his his kids know about, you know, stuff that he does with his boyfriend like going paddleboarding over the weekend. It's like, this is how he relates to the kids. And I thought, on the one hand, I don't think the bill actually says you can't do that. So that's, I mean, this is kind of some of the conflating of so many, so many, so many things, and people kind of not really understanding what the law is. But also, I was just trying to remember my kindergarten teacher. I don't remember ever hearing anything about my kindergarten teachers love life. You know, I wouldn't know if she was married or she was gay or straight. I wouldn't know except for the fact that I think she had like Mrs. At the front of her name. That was like the only indicator we had that five years old. I didn't even know what that meant. I didn't know what Mrs. meant. I didn't know the difference between Mrs. and Mrs. And Miss. I didn't understand that. And I remember like in elementary school, like even like, later years, I'm very, you know, kids would always like speculate and gossip about stuff. But but no indications like I don't remember any teachers from kindergarten, first grade, second grade, third grade, elementary school, I don't think it's like, we got to like, even really like middle school until we had like, maybe some concrete ideas. And maybe like, I remember, like, in middle school, like, oh, what this teacher we hear that they're dating that teacher, but like, they would never talk to us about that. And we only really got to confirm when like, her name changed. Right? Exactly. You know, it's like, there was like, I remember there being a degree, it was like, it's not even about it's just like a degree of professionalism. Yes, that I remember, you know, where it's just like, if a kids would ask about these things, the teacher would say, I'm sorry, that's not appropriate for me to talk about your my student. They don't talk it was not professional to talk with your students about your love life, whether you're gay or straight, or what have you. It doesn't matter, even straight relationships, it's not appropriate to talk to elementary school students about those sorts of things. That's not your place. And yet, I wonder if, if that sense of professionalism has has declined over the course of the last generation?

Brian Nichols  
Well, and it's why I brought in the that one point, because in that, in that interview, you're talking about, he uses the exact phrase, his kids, his kids, and he says that, and you hear that expression, you know, our kids, my kids, it's the parents, kids. It's not it's not the state's kids. It's not the the teachers, kids, it's the parents kids. And to what you're saying here, I mean, every single person I would say, who went to school will say, you know, graduate pre 2010, right? Like this, what we're discussing is, you know, that you're not knowing what your teacher did, after hours, really. I mean, that was the norm that was unless I mean, I remember when I was a kid seeing my second grade teacher, Mrs. Fen long out at like the grocery store. And I thought that was the craziest thing. I was like, she goes to the store, she doesn't figure in the classroom forever.

Eric Brakey  
I figured they lived in the school, you know, you leave

Brian Nichols  
to turn the bats and they go into the basement like that. And that floored me but that speaks to how there used to be that separation of the the teacher and the student. Now we're there. Everybody has like, you know that one or two You know, teacher, you can think back to you that you at least you look like, oh, yeah, that was a special teacher, maybe you saw them out of school, maybe you did know their significant other, but likely you didn't really get to build that relationship until you're old enough to build a relationship being what like, middle school, like high school, I remember, I had one phenomenal teacher who was one of my music teachers, and I, you know, I'd say browsify 1415. When I was like, Yeah, he is awesome. Like, you know, he's somebody I want to look up to, and learn and get to know more about, but you're not, you know, having that hyper weird sexual conversation with that teacher, right? Like, that's, that that's not something that you do, and then you bring it down to the scale of kindergarteners to third graders. And then that's it. Like we we see it as being crazy and out of this world. And yet, that's been the the approach that's been taken over by a lot of these hyper leftist activists really have taken over the Democratic Party. And you see this in the mentality of it, you know, again, the collectivization of the children is what's terrifying. It's our kids, it's my kids, his kids like, No, we have to. And this is why it's so important to stop the always explaining away things, we have to fight back, there have to be people out there who are willing to take stances that are not in the majority and are not popular, but are morally ethically, societally true. And in this case, you just see that the fact that parents have been so willing to abdicate responsibility to their their different teachers in the wood that the administration's at these different schools, and now they're waking up to the fact that they've lost, in many cases, a generation of children, but they don't want to lose another generation of children. And yes, this is this is unfortunately, the result of parents being apathetic and yielding that responsibility, and the only thing that's going to change it is by standing up for something that's actually important to you, drawing that line and saying, Enough is enough, and then actually doing something about it. I see this all the time on social media, you know, people will be in the comment section of like, I'm never gonna support one of these democrats again, I'm like, okay, then, like, actually do something beyond just not supporting a Democrat go out, and either actively support libertarian or Republican candidates like be, don't be the change, don't just complain about it actually go out and make a difference. And that's, frankly, I'm not, I'm not trying to promote my own show here. But that's why I do what I do. I'm trying to help people be able to sell the ideas differently, versus just feeling that the only way you can be politically active is to go into a Facebook group, or into a comment section or reply thread on Twitter, and screech until the cows come home. That's not how people how their ideas change. And frankly, that's not how any sale in business or in life is ever made.

Eric Brakey  
Yeah, you know, I think it's easy sometimes in political discourse, when we just kind of look at the surface level of all these issues. Yeah, but it's always I think, the valuable thing is trying to boil down drill down to what's the underlying principle here. And, you know, the principle that I see here is a simple one, which is that at the end of the day, it may, who knows, they say it takes a village to raise a child, that may be true, though, village is not necessarily the government, the government's not necessarily included in that it may or may, or may not take a village to raise a child. But at the end of the day, someone has to be the ultimate authority and decision maker, when it comes to the raising and education of a child. And that needs to be historically has been, and I think just, you know, society works better, when that's the parents of that child. And so it's the parent needs to be the ultimate authority. And that doesn't mean that, you know, you don't, you can't, you know, delegate to other people that, you know, educating your kids for you. That's what we do with schools. I mean, even whether it's the government schools, or private schools, or you and a homeschool Co Op, you might, you know, hire private tutor, you know, but at the end of the day, if you don't be the person who is ultimately the ultimate decision maker, and has the authority to revoke that at any time, and choose a different arrangements are the parents, but I think kind of what you what what you're getting at here is, you know, people have become complacent. I think it gets to this kind of a Yeah, a in authority that is not exercised over a long enough period of time is eroded. And we're kind of at this point now, where the these these government schools just kind of presumed more and more, well, the parents aren't really in charge here. Were the ones who get to call the shots. And I think it's great to see kind of, you know, I'm not sure how much like space left there was on this runway where parents could be able to stand up and assert their authority, but they are now and we're seeing some good changes, you know, with school choice kind of taking taking grip across the country. I think ultimately, I will say like to to conservatives I do think that that that kind of principle of parental rights has to go both ways. Like, you know, liberal parents might make decisions with the raising and education of their kids that we might disagree with. And we need to if we want parental rights to stand for something, we need to respect that too. Yeah, well, and

Brian Nichols  
let's go back to how we got here to I think, I mean, when we're going through the sales cycle, one of the things you want to do is you trace the history figure out how the company or the person you're speaking to got to the position or the solution that they have today. I think we look at parents and in society in general, we really saw this come to a head here and 2023 2022 and that was the deferral to experts, the trust the experts approach, right. And for so long, I mean, we just saw this with the the new Supreme Court nominee who names escaping me. Jackson

Eric Brakey  
helped me Yeah, could tungee Brown Jackson, I think it is.

Brian Nichols  
Yeah, I'm the I'm not I'm not a biologist, when asked the question regarding woman, you know, what a woman is, and and that was, right there, you see full on display this deferral to, I can't have an opinion on something unless I'm told it's okay by some better expert or parent saying, Well, I'm not an expert in XYZ field. So therefore unwilling to advocate my responsibility of this hyper, you know, hyper personal, you know, hyper, I'd say, in many cases, damning choices that kids will make, to an expert that we get, we use this word expert very loosely. But what is expertise? And I think that's the question that we're starting to see, really, the proverbial onion being peeled back is, in many cases, expertise in the way that we see them in society nowadays is nothing more than a pretty piece of paper, or a fancy letter behind the person's name. whereas traditionally, expertise was based on somebody being able not to just to be able to talk about something, but actually do something with that idea to bring it into the real life and make the ideas applicable to what's actually happening. And we've seen that the the deferral to expertise has become almost this this ivory tower, the laptop class approach to life into governance, it's why people feel so emboldened to talk about, you know, you know, cheering nuclear war over due to what's happening in Ukraine. That's not them. They're not the ones who are having to deal with inflation, they're not the ones who are going to have to deal with oil crisis ease, they're not that they say, go buy a Tesla, right, stop being poor. And that's and that right there is now because the experts are also the people who, in many cases, quite literally hate you. That people are starting to fight back against this, this BS expertise approach to not just the way we govern ourselves, but also the way we live our lives and the way we raise our kids, hey, I don't want the quote unquote, government expert in the public school, the government school, teaching my kids, I'm going to go to a private school or a charter school and use my tax dollars there, because let's fund some students versus funding stupid systems.

Eric Brakey  
Right? I mean, it would be one thing if we had a free market and expertise, right, the people who we who we recognize as experts, this is something that comes about through just like them generally, just like in a free marketplace, you know, being the best. And we recognize that they're the best at that. But what we have is centrally planned expertise. These are centrally planned systems, where people are curtailed, people are kind of cultivated along certain lines, often kind of with direct government involvement. I mean, you know, I think one of the most obvious examples of this is, you know, we can look at economics, the fields of economics, that people were generally regarded as experts in economics, tend to be Keynesians, which is, in my opinion, totally a totally bogus school of economics that has been specifically cultivated because it gives the politicians the answers that they want, enabling them to justify printing trillions of dollars out of thin air and spending it and how they want handing it out to their special interest buddies. Like it is it is, you know, what it's like along the lines of what we might have called in the past the court historians you know, when the when the king Commission's historians to write the history in a way that makes the king always the hero and the good guy in our country's the best. That's like, of course, this is an organically developing, this is an organic expertise. This is these are these are people who are serving their patrons, right. And at the same time, you look at like the Austrian School of Economics, which is you whenever you hear from the government or from the corporate press, like who the experts are in economics, you never see them to highlighting anyone in the Austrian School of Economics and yet, and yet, like Here we are, and they say, Wow, nobody saw this inflation coming. Nobody saw it coming. Well, nobody in the expert class, the the the corporate press approved, the government approved experts. But you know, these people who you say aren't experts, because they are the ones who've been saying don't print all the money. By definition, they're not experts, because they're given the answers that the government doesn't want. These These folks are these folks are or anyway, they're, they're not held up as experts. So those are experts that I have a lot of respect for. I have a lot of respect for the expertise of people like Jeff diced at the Mises Institute, and, and a lot of these folks, so I have a lot of respect for experts, but it's not generally the experts that the government tells us to respect.

Brian Nichols  
Yeah, well, and it shows you why there is such a discrepancy between public sector and private sector. And really, I think it goes back to why what Cory D'Angelo is doing and what we were talking about earlier with just not only getting students out of government schools, but also like parents taking back over the responsibility of raising your children. And I say that both from the the education standpoint, but also from your your morals, your ethics, what, you know, what is good, what is bad, that's important, and it's important for parents to be the ones that are having that conversation with their children. And I think it's, it's really showing right now, why the advent of new technology are so exciting, because they're gonna, they're really going to make an already in many cases have made the traditional Government Solutions, which by their nature, in many cases are monopolies. It's making them inefficient. It's, it's showing the chinks in the armor. And we're seeing this I mean, Khan Academy, right, I forget the name of the organization Elon has been doing, but it's all focused on like games and helping kids learn through games, YouTube, God, YouTube, are all the things that we can hate on YouTube for it has single handedly done more to help educate people across all ages on a variety of topics, then any course or college or school could ever teach. I mean, I learned a little bit in my technology class, which was woodworking basically, but like, am I using that in an inexplicable way today? No, but what I am using is the real life things that I can learn when I'm going out. And, you know, going out my father in law and doing little projects in the house, right or, back when I was up in the North Country, helping my dad fix a tractor, like that stuff is his stuff. That's real life. That's, it makes Yeah, it makes the the education, it makes the the knowledge, applicable to real life. And, and I actually I had a professor back in college. And I'm very thankful for him and him saying this, because he used to be a corporate executive for about 30 years. And he went to go to college to teach at school explicitly, and exclusively for the fact that he knew he had to be a different voice from a management perspective than what was being taught in college campuses. And he would use to say, there's two different books that you're going to read, you're going to read the management textbook that every professor will give you as the reading text for the year. Then there's my book, then there's my textbook, and my textbook is literally 500 pages of emails of processes of systems that I've used over 30 years of a career. And, and not only has it worked, but there's reasons at work. There's there's there's principles that work culture in companies is super important. But yet, you don't hear that really taught a lot in management classes. So let's focus on the things that really do matter. The things that are important. And the more that we've seen technology get to the point now where those people who are saying, Yeah, you know, what, it doesn't have to be the this, you know, just completely arbitrary pie in the sky solution. Instead, let's make these ideas we have and look to see if there's tangible ways to make them real. And I think Bitcoin really was the main launching off point here with people seeing what's possible in this web three space, just as the internet was with people realizing what was able impossible in our current space. And I think as we move forward, it we're just gonna see this by the very nature of the way that technology is going to be be presented to us is that when the government solutions become almost just not now, it's just not necessary, like they almost obsolete, it's like, why would you? Why would you go and get the lesser quality product when you can go ahead and get a much higher quality product in many cases, and a much more affordable cost. And that right there we're going to see people just start to reject Government Solutions, except and this is the big except Except those who are funded and Who are supported by the government institutions which are currently funded by extortion by taxes. So that's why we have to play the game. And I get, I get the argument from folks who don't want to get involved in the political arena. I understand I talked about this with business owners all the time. But it's gonna keep being involved with you until you get involved until we start to either neuter the means to funding this or start to change fundamentally, the way that we interact with government, it's going to be have to be one of those two things. And if you're the business owner, you're going to have to be the one that does that change. It can't just be the consumer, it also has to be the producer side as well. People who

Eric Brakey  
love Liberty, getting involved in politics, that's an act of self defense. And we should all be for self defense. People say, Oh, government is violence. I don't want to be involved in this. It's like, yes, it's violence being used against us. Yep. So we got to fight back, we got to lean in, we got to engage. And we've got to, it doesn't mean that we should try to take that ring of power and use it against our enemies, like in the same way that it's used against us, we should get that ring of power. And then we should erode its power so that market forces free the forces of freedom can can can replace these very coercive institutions that do so much harm. But you mentioned you mentioned YouTube. And, boy, I remember when I was younger, you know, YouTube being such a great tool. You know, so many I like I had the access to the Library of Alexandria at my fingertips. I was watching Milton Friedman videos, interviews with iron, Rand Ron Paul, like debate clips, and so many things that like, really informed me and gave me access to so much knowledge that I would not really get from traditional mainstream establishment sources. And that really allowed me to become who I am today. And it's so sad to see the censorship that is going on now on platforms like YouTube, and Twitter. And so many of these these places that were once really, really great. Great, you know, if they were platforms of innovation in the decentralization of information, yep. But of course, I woke up yesterday, Monday, maybe you did, too. And we saw there's a new king of Twitter. That's right. Elon Musk coming in and buying like, somewhere between nine and 10% of all 92%. He's the biggest, biggest shareholder in Twitter now like three times as much as its founder, Jack Dorsey. Yeah. Jack Dorsey who Jack I've had a lot of respect for Jack Dorsey for a long time, because I could see I felt like he was like, when he was their CEO, Twitter, I felt like if you could like, I'm being a little hyperbolic here, but I felt like at times, it's like, you want to like watch his like, his like his eyes blinking to see if he's given Morse code is in Morse code like SOS. I'm surrounded by crazy people here. Someone saved me.

Brian Nichols  
You can see that Joe Rogan interview. Um, it was actually it was it was Joe Rogan. And Tim Poole. Right and called that coming full circle. And it Jack Dorsey brought on his I forget her role, but it was like the chief explaining officer, like these are why we have these arbitrary BS policies. And Jack's like, I don't want to explain it because this is stupid. Go ahead, and then make the girl go ahead and explain why the policy makes sense, which never did. Sorry for doing the Joe Biden thing by the way. He leans into the microphone, and he whispers That's so creepy. I hate it. Old Man smelling or something.

Eric Brakey  
But yeah, I kind of felt like on the one hand, when Jack Dorsey left, I kind of felt like, you know, good for Jack Dorsey. He obviously was very uncomfortable there. This was a case of a company that he started that had kind of he kind of seemed like he had remained a figurehead there. But it forced to defend policies that he obviously was very uncomfortable with. It kind of reminded me a little bit of like, Donald Trump is president of the United States. It's like, obviously, you're the president of this, this this organization, but you're obviously people you don't seem to be the one calling the shots like you can like give orders and the and the organization has a mind of its own. And so good for him Jack Dorsey got out he was

Brian Nichols  
no way. I will say Eric, he should have clean house if that's the case. Like I could not imagine if like at my company if my day job right? If my my co workers around me, like all just were like eff you to the CEO. Number one, that would never happen because that's again, culture matters. That's why it's so important. None of us would ever do that. But number two, even if we did, he should have the right and frankly, he should fire all of us on the spot. Like the fact that Jack Dorsey didn't see what was happening internally and be like No, no like out unfortunately, he helped enable some of this and you know, I will say he has come to terms with that. I think he has been talking about this in mass and like he apologizes for the role he's played in in web two and the centralization of the Burnett, and you know what, thank you. Thank you for saying that, like, people being humble in admitting when they are wrong. That is like one of the most refreshing things in 2022.

Eric Brakey  
Yeah, well, he's, yeah, I don't know what's next for him. But I, you know, and I sometimes I feel like it now you're you have run your own business, I feel like, you know, maybe you have some more experience to speak from in that regard. But I sometimes look at an organization as massive as Twitter. And I wonder just kind of how much one person can really be in charge of all these things? And how much and how much the organization manages to insulate itself from the person in charge, like we've seen with our Oh, hey,

Brian Nichols  
I look at Elon. And this is why I'm so excited for Elon like Tesla, they have been just killing it, you go back to the articles that were written, you know, 10 years or 10, five years ago about how you know, Tesla, it's, it's not going to be a company, it's gonna go bankrupt, you know, mismanagement from on top, and Elon has been culturally, just setting the tone for his company from the beginning. And that's why when you bring people into that environment, you see the success because they're all going towards this same mission, where if you go to Twitter, what's the mission of Twitter? Like, do they know it back when it started? It was supposed to be a free speech Townsquare. That was the the role of it. But yeah, that is mission anymore. No. What is the mission? I don't know as Twitter, you probably get 15 different answers from 15 different employees. And I think that speaks to why there is such a just a crumbling, and that's why there was a big void and why Elon is the king of Dubai now.

Eric Brakey  
Well, I know you got a heart out. And I want to make sure we wrap up in time. But of course, I just do want to add, so yesterday, Elon bought, got his we all found out. He's the biggest shareholder on Twitter. today. We find out now he's on the board of directors. Who knows what's next. But let me ask you prediction? Yep. Do you think Trump's getting his Twitter account back?

Brian Nichols  
Oh, yes. I could see him getting his Twitter account back. I could see the Babylon B. And Alex forgetting their their Twitter accounts back, I could see a lot of names from people getting their accounts back, I would not be surprised in the slightest.

Eric Brakey  
Well, that would be a great day. Not that I'm always like the I have my own criticisms of of Trump at time. So think he's, you know, anyway, we don't have time for me to give a whole dialogue on Trump. But certainly, it's crazy. When the President of the United States was kicked off of Twitter, when used to have like, was like members of like, al Qaeda, the Taliban, they're still on Twitter. This is crazy. So there has to be there have to be universal standards. And frankly, those universal standards for Twitter to be of any value need to be in favor of free speech. I'm okay with the Taliban being on Twitter. I just think our pres, our former president should be able to be on Twitter, too.

Brian Nichols  
Is that too much to ask?

Eric Brakey  
Jesus? I would hope not. All right. Hey, Brian. Final thoughts.

Brian Nichols  
Final thoughts? I will go back to one of the main feedbacks I've gotten from my appearance on Tim Poole. And people thought that I was like, sickeningly sickeningly optimistic. And there's a reason for that. It's because we have to be optimistic if we're going to be I mean, you become what you think if we think negative thoughts, we think the Doom is doom and gloom, the end is near, then that will be our reality. We have to see the light at the end of the tunnel, there has to be a light at the end of the tunnel. Otherwise, what are we doing this for? So be the change, be optimistic and stay positive? Always?

Eric Brakey  
Yeah, I think it's important to be a long term optimist. You can be a short term pessimists, but be a long term optimist. Because if you're a long term pessimists, then that's just like admitting that all is lost. There's nothing we can do. You might as well just like, go home, and you're gonna work. Yeah, so be a long term optimist. Because in the long term, with consistent effort, applied day after day, in your life, and with the lives of all of us in this decentralized liberty movement, we can change things and we are changing things. Look at constitutional carry 25 states now half of the states in America constitutional carry, that's decentralized Liberty efforts across the country making a difference. So all right, we're gonna end there, Brian, thank you. This has been another episode who shows it anyway, because this is going to air on both The Brian Nichols Show and free America now. Always love doing this with you, Brian. Thanks so much. All right. All right, everyone. I'll be back on Thursday with a guest. I don't know who it's going to be yet. But until then, furthermore, my opinion is the Federal Reserve should be destroyed. See you then.

Brian Nichols  
In a world full of yours, be a Tigger in the world of a Federal Reserve. Be the nuclear bomb.

Eric Brakey  
In a world of censorship on Twitter, be Elon Musk. Elon

Brian Nichols  
Musk it up are you tired of wasting your time watching people argue about politics? Are you ready to learn how to take liberty based solutions and bring them to your average person and get those ideas into action? Hi, my name is Brian Nichols, sales executive and host of The Brian Nichols Show as a senior communications consultant in the greater telecommunications in cybersecurity sector. I've spent years working with C level executives to help them future proof their company's infrastructure for an uncertain future. At The Brian Nichols Show, I'm bringing my sales coaching and expertise to the liberty movement. Why? Because instead of focusing on winning arguments, we're teaching the basic fundamentals of sales and marketing and how we can use them to win in the world of politics, teaching you how to meet people where they're at on the issues they care about, subscribe to the program at Brian Nichols show.com and find the show on your favorite podcast app again, that's Brian Nichols. show.com. And oh, be sure to grab my free copy of my new ebook, four easy steps you can take to sell liberty to friends and family. Right now while you're there. One more time. That's Brian Nichols show.com

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Eric Brakey Profile Photo

Eric Brakey

Senior Spokesperson

Eric Brakey is the senior spokesperson for Young Americans for Liberty. He served two terms in the Maine Senate and as the 2012 Maine State Director for the Ron Paul Presidential Campaign.